dadapj.franchise-lipetsk.ru

People updating from bash

No longer do we have to use the finger pointing emoji and the a-ok sign emoji when we’re feeling a bit frisky. Humans have always been sexual creatures, and now we’re sexual creatures with cell phones and wi-fi connections and we’re taking advantage of it.
We don't buy our database from third parties nor will we share your information with any third party.

Sex dating in epworth south carolina

Rated 4.45/5 based on 580 customer reviews
Free cyber chat lines Add to favorites

Online today

[Bergs conducts three case studies in Middle English sociolinguistics to test the applicability of Lesley Milroy’s (1987) concept of social network to historical data analysis. Clark has also published a translation of Walsingham’s . [The book demonstrates that the theatrum repudiated by medieval clerics was not “theater” as we understand the term today. [Crassons focuses on the period after the plague, when theological and social conceptions shifted to consider poverty as “a symptom of idleness and other sins” rather than a sign of virtue, as had been the case in the thirteenth-century wake of the fraternal orders (5). “Discarding Traditional Pastoral Ethics: Wycliffism and Slander.” Bose and Hornbeck 227-242. “Heresy Hunting and Clerical Reform: William Warham, John Colet, and the Lollards of Kent, 1511–12.” . [“Wykeham’s administrative talents ensured that he became bishop of Winchester, holder of one of the richest sees in Christendom and Chancellor of England under Edward III and Richard II. Louvain–la-Neuve: Fédération Internationale des Institutes d’Etudes Médiévales, 1998. Instead, the pope would relate to his fellow bishops as St. His fellow Christians would recognize this man as their true pope, for he would be the person most closely resembling the apostolic martyrs and thus prove a genuine disciple of Christ. “Books for Laymen, The Demise of a Commonplace: Lollard Texts and the Justification of Images as a Continuity of Belief and Polemic.” 56.4 (1987): 457-73. [Peikola begins by noting that Lollard writers frequently “opt for a collective and atemporal mode of discourse” as opposed to a discourse which is self-consciously personal or historically situated. Investigating 127 manuscripts of the Bible, he attends to running headers, initials, and especially ruling patterns to “establish whether any such groupings of manuscripts emerge which could provide a starting point for further and more detailed case studies of book productions involving the Wycliffite Bible” (51).] —. finds that finds a mature alternative to Genevan theology existed by the reign of Mary Tudor, led by of a core of ‘freewill men’ who, in Lollard fashion, looked to the scriptures in English for their beliefs, rather than to the new ecclesiastical establishment and state officialdom.”] Peschke, Erhard. New York: Augustinian Historical Institute, 1961-66. Aside from the Paston Letters and the Peterborough Chronicle, he examines Lollard texts for “to,” “for to,” and “null” methods of infinitive complement marking, finding that the Wycliffite group developed a distinctive and normative language use that excluded “for to” in many of its functions.] Bernard, P. “Heresy in 14th Century Austria.” 40.3 (2010): 439-61. Clopper contends that critics have misrepresented Western stage history because they have assumed that theatrum designates a place where drama is performed. [Crassons’ essay “argues that the Wycliffite sermon of William Taylor presents seemingly contradictory arguments about the role of poverty work, and charity within Christian society. [Craun demonstrates how Lollards adapted a pastoral discourse on fraternal correction to validate their criticisms of the contemporary church, especially those directed at friars. “Die Beziehungen John Wiclifs und der Lollarden zu den Bettelmönchen.” [“The relationship of John Wyclif and the Lollards with the Mendicant Friars.”] Dissertation. ‘Everything was done by him and nothing was done without him’ wrote the contemporary chronicler, Jean Froissart. Wyclif actually bears comparison to two other fourteenth-century critics: Marsilius of Padua and William of Ockham. “William Langland’s ‘Kynde Name’: Authorial Signature and Social Identity in Late Fourteenth Century England.” Lee Patterson, ed. [According to the abstract, “The exact relationship between Lollardy and the sixteenth-century Reformation long has eluded students of English history. Peikola investigates exceptions to this, asking how and why a more personal voice arises, how often it happens, and what it can tell us about the “situational context of texts.” He approaches this linguistically, examining texts for specific lexical markers (first person pronouns, specific verb forms, exclamations) which indicate a self-consciously subjective voice, and examining the distribution of these markers. “The Sanctorale, Thomas of Woodstock’s English Bible, and the Orthodox Appropriation of Wycliffite Tables of Lessons.” Bose and Hornbeck 153-174. “Die Bedeutung Wiclefs für die Theologie der Böhmen.” . [Though Lollardy is not the topic of Peters’ book, its later medieval context is. [Discussing especially the Bible, Robertson takes advantage of post-colonial theory “to analyze how English began to assert itself as a fit medium for intellectual work in late medieval Britain. aka Sunnon Carlos Hugo BOURBON (Duke) of PARMA (Paris 8/4/1930 - 18/8/2010 Barcelona) ; aka Charles Hugues Xavier Marie Sixte Louis Robert Jean Georges Benoit Michel; Count of MONTEMOLIN; (PRETENDER-KING of SPAIN) John (Major) MONTGOMERY (Eaglesham, Renfrews.? This bibliography is intended to embrace all fields relevant to Lollard studies. Swinderby’s links with early Wycliffism are elucidated and the relationship between Wycliffism and the Church is looked at in a new light.”] —. [Fudge examines the ideas rather than the history of the Hussite movement, arguing that it is the “First Reformation,” distinct from the movements begun by Wyclif or Luther, in order to “close the gap between a history of ideas and social history” (3).] —. [Observing that scholarship on Lollard texts – even from literary scholars – focuses almost exclusively on cultural and theological content rather than aesthetics, Gayk argues for more attention to the form of Lollard writings. “Ecclesiastics and Political Theory in Late Medieval England: The End of a Monopoly.” Dobson 23-44. “The Dissemination of Manuscripts Relating to English Political Thought in the Fourteenth Century.” . [From the publisher: “This book charts the emergence of women’s writing from the procedures of heresy trials and recovers a tradition of women’s trial narratives from the late Middle Ages to the seventeenth century. At the center of Wyclif’s theology there is always a Living Person.] —. She traces the story of the literature of complaint from the earliest written bills and their links with early complaint poems in English, French, and Latin, through writings associated with political crises of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, to the libels and petitionary pamphlets of Reformation England. His heresy was assumed to be not simply a dereliction of his duties towards his church, but a dereliction of the demands of his class” (56).] Schaff, D. [“The purpose of this brief note is to suggest that the influence of the English religious reformer Wycliffe might be discerned in the First Lithuanian Catechism. [According to Shagan, “This study of popular responses to the English Reformation analyzes how ordinary people received, interpreted, debated, and responded to religious change. [This is a preliminary study of the Acta of Jerome’s trial, which is “the only source for learning about the Reformist activities not only of this Wycliffite, but also of his radical circle in the years 1409-14” (324), of which there seem to exist separate collections. According to the author’s abstract, “This paper attempts a preliminary assessment of that judgment and argues that, pending further study, we have no reason to accept it.

(158) [724-728] Cinaed (Cinaeth Kenneth), son of Irgalach, son of Conaing Cuirri, son of Conghal, son of Aed Slaine Mac DIARMATA (159) [728-734] Flaithbertach Mac LOINGSECH (? ) ; aka Flaherty (160) [734-743] Aedh IV (Allan) `the Handsome', son of Fergal (O'NEILL) Mac MAEL DUIN (Mac MAOLDUIN) (161) [743-763] Domnall Midi Mac MURCHAD (? ) ; aka Donal of IRELAND; King of MIDE (Meath) (162) [763-770] Niall Frossach (Frasach) Mac Fergal O'NEILL (718? ) ; `of the Showers' (163) [770-797] Donnchad (I) Midi Mac DOMNAILL (O'NEILL) (? - 919) ; aka Njal GLUNDUBH; aka Niall IV `Black-Knee' (171) [919-944] Donnchad Donn Mac FLAINN (? ) (172) [944-956] Congalach III `Cnogba', son of Maelmithigh, son of Flanagan, son of Ceallach, son of Conaing Mac CONGALACH.Start instead with Hudson’s 1988 study of Thomas Netter as a Resource for Contemporary Theology.” Bergström-Allen and Copsey 335-361. “Christ’s Humanity and Piers Plowman: Contexts and Political Implications.” Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2000. “The Sacrament of the Altar in Piers Plowman and the Late Medieval Church in England.” Dimmick, Simpson, and Zeeman 63-80. We must not begin our reading of the poem with the assumption that to set aside the dominant, orthodox representation of the sacrament of the altar is to set aside sacramental theology and the sacrament of the alter–even if that is what orthodox polemic was not claiming” (65, 67).] —. The developments that led to their eventual demise are discussed. Language exists as a material reality because it is a form of social behavior” (1). “Intentionality and Truth-Making: Augustine’s Influence on Burley and Wyclif’s Propositional Semantics.” 45 (2007): 283-97. Throughout , Wyclif rejects the doctrine of transubstantiation because it seems to turn God into a liar. “The Lollards’ Threefold Biblical Agenda.” Bose and Hornbeck 211-226. “University College, Oxford, MS 97 and its Relationship to the Simeon Manuscript (British Library Add. At once constituting heterodoxy and masking it, their discussions of credulity urge a great public awareness of discourse and provide a rhetoric to that end.” Grudin concludes the article with a discussion of credulity in several Canterbury tales.] Gurevich, Aaron. [“This article discusses the difficulty in teaching and translating works by authors Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich. “English Biblical Texts Before Lollardy and their Fate.” Somerset, Havens, and Pitard 141-53. [On Partridge’s “Notebook,” describing the contents of the manuscript and how it reveals his turn towards “favouring heretical, Lollard opinions” (44).] —. Furthermore, we will see that Wyclif most often presents a God who is at once just and merciful, extending grace and the possibility of salvation to all” (279-80). “John Wyclif: Christian Patience in a Time of War.” 66.2 (June 2005): 330-357. Minnis characterizes its subject matter as a typical subject of inquiry for scholastic theologians and often compares Wyclif’s views on bodily pleasure, death, and dominion to Aquinas’ writings.] Moessner, Lilo. Wyclif, on the other hand, reads much into the requirement that all our linguistic distinctions should have their basis in extramental reality: our conceptualisations not only pertain to individual substances, but also parallel their distinct ontic layers.”] Spufford, P. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2005. [Stanbury situates Chaucer’s representation of images within the Lollard image debate.] —. Katherine, Knighton’s Lollards, and the Breaking of Idols.” Dimmick, Simpson, and Zeeman 131-50. How [Stanbury asks] was the drama of the image shaped by contemporary discourses about images as 46.1 (2015): 249-76. “Inventing Legality: Documentary Culture and Lollard Preaching.” . [“This chapter examines three episodes from the life of the Blessed Virgin which Thomas Netter uses to illustrate various points in his arguments with the Lollards” (335).] —. According to the abstract, “from his death in 1430 until the middle of the eighteenth century, Netter was a much-quoted and copied author whose exposition of Catholic teaching on subjects such as the Church, religious life, and the sacraments proved useful to many Counter-Reformation polemicists and apologists. [Aers is primarily concerned with Langland, but uses Lollardy at several points. “John Wyclif: Poverty and the Poor.” 17 (2003): 55-72. The evidence that the prominent English Wycliffe and a leader of the Hussite movement in Bohemia, Peter Payne, stayed among them between 14 is also reviewed. “Material language practice” includes various choices writers make (about diction, genre, etc.), and Barr examines a variety of texts to show how later medieval writers deployed these practices to produce social commentary. “The Deafening Silence of Lollardy in the Digby Lyric.” Bose and Hornbeck 243-260. [“Walter Burley (1275-c.1344) and John Wyclif (1328-1384) follow two clearly stated doctrinal options: on the one hand, they are realists and, on the other, they defend a correspondence theory of truth that involves specific correlates for true propositions, in short: truth-makers. If God could separate accidents from their proper substances, make Christ’s body appear like mere bread, Wyclif doubts we could ever be sure of anything. [Based on comments in the Prologue to the Wycliffite Bible, Dove describes the Lollards’ biblical agenda as threefold: “to enable simple people to have the Bible (or access to it), to understand it, and to live in accordance with it.” This essay primarily discusses the issue of understanding scripture, comparing statements on literal and figurative interpretation in the Prologue to the Wycliffite Bible with other Middle English treatises on biblical translation, including The Holi Prophete Dauid.] Doyle, A. “Books Connected with the Vere Family and Barking Abbey.” n.s. “Heresy and Literacy: Evidence of the Thirteenth-century Exempla.” Biller and Hudson 104-111. “Richard Rolle’s English Psalter and the Making of a Lollard Tract.” 33 (2002): 294-309. The article suggests that modern readers are unfamiliar with mysticism and that college students would be better served to learn about both authors in a British literature survey course. “Oxford, Bodleian Library, Bodley 647 and its Use, c.1410-2010.” In . [Wyclif was well acquainted with the medieval traditions of just war and crusading articulated by theologians and canon lawyers. [Minnis finds insufficient influence of Nominalism (defined as modern critics have used the term) on Chaucer. [Considers two questions asked of Brut, “whether women are suitable ministers to confect the sacrament of the Eucharist,” and “whether women confect or can confect as true priests the sacrament of the Eucharist” (92). “Translation Strategies in Middle English: The Case of the Wycliffite Bible.” , arguing that they “serve as a call to conversion” (24). “Conciliarism and Heresy in England.” Gillespie and Ghosh 155-165. “The Comparative Mobility and Immobility of Lollard Descendants in Early Modern England.” Spufford 309-31. [Staley’s fascinating work on the relationship between history and literature in the later middle ages turns here to reading, as she says, “the ways in which late-fourteenth-century English writers used, analyzed, and altered the languages of power. [Stanbury begins with Knighton’s description of the 1382 Lollard burning of an statue of St. [Stavsky examines how Wyclif and Wycliffite writers explicated and employed the story of Susanna and the Elders, paying special attention to the politics of such writing, especially manifested in their images of community. This has a number of implications for how one might reconsider the English trial evidence, some of which are briefly explored in the essay.”] Asaka, Yoshiko. She argues, for instance, that the theology of Corpus Christi in the resurrection plays can only be understood as a theatrical exploration of eucharistic absence and presence. In the following, I shall discuss Wyclif’s arguments by comparing them with some other medieval positions, as well as with some elements of contemporary theories of speech acts. [This is a study of Walsingham, not just a historican but also a classical scholar. Moreover, he sought to publicize and publicly refute the errors of the heretics, eschewing show trials and burnings. Wood Lecture Delivered before the University of London on 13 March, 1951.” Pamphlet. in 1413 in order to articulate his criticism of the Christian community of his day and the proclaim his evangelical vision of the Church. in 1550 because he was a follower of heretic John Wyclif, whose teachings were similar to beliefs expounded in the poem. The church of the late fourteenth century would come to resemble the ecclesia primitiva, a poor communion of fellow workers marked by charity and humility. One of them is to say, with a reductive literalism, that “Tobit had a dog” is not conducive to salvation (48).] —. The subversiveness of translation arises not only out of its status as a heretical text or its use to mount challenges to clerical and secular political authority. “The Problem of Poverty and Literacy: 66 (1975): 5-23. “Of grace and gross bodies: Falstaff, Oldcastle, and the fires of reform.” Ph. Beckwith frames her study with discussions of twentieth-century manifestations of sacramental theater in Barry Unsworth’s novel , and the connections between contemporary revivals of the York Corpus Christi plays and England’s heritage culture.”] Bennett, H. “The Production and Dissemination of Vernacular Manuscripts in the Fifteenth Century.” 4 (2000): 239-51. It will appear that in his analysis of the only sacrament which is a “social act“ in the literal sense of the expression, Wyclif (i) clearly acknowledges the central role of individual intentions behind (linguistic) conventions, and (ii) carefully distinguishes between the different, chronologically disparate acts involved in marriage and their respective (semantic, psychological and factual) felicity conditions.”] Chadwick, Dorothy. His chronicles provide crucial evidence for Wycliffism. This policy ultimately failed, and was replaced with more direct action which saw several key heretics [including Thomas Bilney] handed over for burning.”] —. Davis highlights Wykeham’s extraordinarily commitment to good governance and his extensive involvement in English politics between . The moral revolution of the Church that Hus called for in his day finds a clear echo in Vatican II’s . “The Early Fourteenth-Century Context for the Doctrine of Divine Foreknowledge in Wyclif’s Latin Sermons.” . Those ties to Wyclif may have kept the poem from being published previously, but the author believes that the poem’s obscure northern dialect of Middle English is more likely to blame.] Haines, R. “‘Wilde Wittes and Wilfulnes’: John Swetstock’s Attack on those ‘poyswunmongeres,’ the Lollards.” . Within this holy fellowship there would be a place for the papacy, but it would no longer resemble the monarchy it had ascended to in the later Middle Ages. “‘Oonly consent of love is sufficient for matrimonie’: Translating John Wyclif’s Word of the Mind.” In , ed. I argue that translation is also subversive because it challenges the claim to an ‘original’ and to an ‘origin.'” Ng therefore examines defenses of translation in the General Prologue (though she also refers to Trevisa) and Tyndale to describe “the narrative about a newly developing relation between a Christian believer and (translated) text.”] Nichols, Ann Eljenholm. ‘silently guides the reader towards a certain reception'” (5). “The Franciscans and their Books: Lollard Accusations and the Franciscan Response.” Hudson and Wilks 364-84. not LONGESPEE) The 1st and 2nd Milesian Monarchs were brothers, and 33-great grandsons of Adam in early legends. - 1699 BC) ; aka Eremon (Eermon Eremoin) Mac MILED (3) Muimhne mac Eremoin, son of Heremon of IRELAND (4) Luighine mac Eremoin, son of Heremon of IRELAND (5) Laighean mac Eremoin, son of Heremon of IRELAND (6) Er mac Eber, son of Eber Finn Mac MILED (7) Orba mac Eber, son of Eber Finn Mac MILED (8) Fearon mac Eber, son of Eber Finn Mac MILED (9) Fergen mac Eber, son of Eber Finn Mac MILED (-) Nuadhat Neacht, ruled for six months, descendant of 2nd Monarch. Monarchy was contested during and after the reign of 179th Monarch. aka Turlogh II (King) of CONNACHT (182) [1156-1166] Muirchertach Mac LOCHLAINN (1110? ) ; aka Murcertac (Murtough) III O'NEIL (183) [1166-1186] Ruaidri (II) Ua CONCHOBAIR (? John Thomas MONTGOMERY (another descendant of Alexander Master of MONTGOMERY (q.v., d. )); (he or brother had a son who emigrated from Armagh to Pennsylvania about same time as Deborah) [William MONTGOMERY (d. : grandfather of Ann Whitesides)] John (Major) MONTGOMERY (Eaglesham, Renfrews.?